Dimitris Ameladiotis

Dimitris Ameladiotis was born in 1979 in Thessaloniki. He studied painting at the Fine Arts School of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, at the Audiovisual Department of Gent University, Belgium and earned a master’s degree at the Chelsea College of Fine Arts in London. He has presented three solo exhibitions: Elika gallery, Athens (2010) / Tsatsis Projects gallery, Thessaloniki (2007 and 2003). He has also participated in various group exhibitions, projects and residencies in Greece and abroad: Hovikartanon Art Residence, in situ artworks production in collaboration with Eleni Theofylaktou, Summelina Filland (2010) / Summer 10×10 artists, Elika Gallery, Athens (2010) / ΜelodramThes project, independent group action by the kangaroo court in public space, Thessaloniki (2010) / Young Artists From Thessaloniki, Ikastikos Kyklos Gallery, Athens (2010) / About the Kiosk project, independent action in collaboration with George Paliatsios (2009) / Nexus Machine Shop, 2nd  Conference or Transcultural Exchange Organization of Arts, Boston, USA (2009) / Translate me, independent space at  48 Aeolou Street, Athens (2008) / Donopoulos’ Collection, Donopoulos Gallery, Thessaloniki (2008) / Scissors, stone, paper, RKB gallery, London (2008) / Condensation 1, Decima Gallery, London (2008) / Free Associations, Chelsea Space, London (2007) / The Golden Age, a.antonopoulou gallery, Athens (2007) / Art Karlikevi Residency, Caesareia, Turkey (2006) / Kodra Action Field 04, Thessaloniki (2004) / Kodra Action Field 03, Thessaloniki (2003). He is a member of the art collaborative project groups PalAmeA and Kangaroo Court.

 

The small objects I created during the International Young Artists’ Workshop are not a direct visual representation of the “domino” theme, which is also the Workshop’s title. Reflecting on the process that led to the creation of all these objects, the end product might give the impression of resembling the domino game and its familiar lineup of small tiles.

 

However, these objects might also entail the sociopolitical meaning and dimension of the “domino effect”. Under this light, my work could be seen as acquiring a more allegorical meaning: using widely different objects in terms of size (others are big while others are tiny) and structure (some are held by a thin thread, others are floating or are randomly kept upright, while others are firmly positioned on the ground), I created a fragile dynamic, which gives the impression that a single movement could make them all crumble and topple each other.

         

Throughout this process, during the time I spent in the workshop, another question arose; a question that the audience is not required, of course, to answer, but should keep in mind when seeing my work. I was wondering about the origin of a contradiction that was produced unconsciously rather than on purpose: with the exception of the assemblages that are clearly the product of intense processing, how can it be that there are others among them, which were completed with minimal gestures?

Photos

Untitled, mixed media, dimensions variable, 2011, courtesy of the artist, commisioned by the 3rd Thessaloniki Biennale of Contemporary Art
Untitled, mixed media, dimensions variable, 2011, courtesy of the artist, commisioned by the 3rd Thessaloniki Biennale of Contemporary Art
Untitled, mixed media, dimensions variable, 2011, courtesy of the artist, commisioned by the 3rd Thessaloniki Biennale of Contemporary Art

Untitled (12th Istanbul Biennial), 2011 Biennale de Lyon