Pavlos Nikolakopoulos

Born (1973) in Athens, where he lives and works. He studied at Athens School of Fine Arts. Pavlos Nikolakopoulos is interested in the notion of “discontinuity” where things are not formed through a smooth and regular stream, but from different interferences or random parameters such as accidental events, time, conflicts, and mistakes. Discontinuity disrupts normality and the “paralytic” consensus of the affluent society. Through this notion imagination and critical thinking are stimulated, setting a ground for social claims and revolts. This is reflected in the diaries that do not represent a personal perspective deriving from an inner psychology, they rather illustrate issues concerning the essence of human condition; the interrelation between individual and social structures along with the reversal of stereotypical approaches. Recent group exhibitions (selection): Dialogues 2005, Macedonian Museum of Contemporary Art (Thessaloniki, 2005); Drawing Screen, Museum of Cinema (Thessaloniki, 2006); Heterotopias, 1st Biennale of Contemporary Art (Thessaloniki, 2007); Aftermath, 25th Alexandria Biennial, (Alexandria, Egypt, 2009).

 

I am interested in the notion of “discontinuity” (asynexeia), where things are not formed through a smooth and regular stream but from different interferences or random parameters such as accidental events, time, conflicts and mistakes. Discontinuity disrupts normality and the “paralytic” consensus of the affluent society. Through this notion imagination and critical thinking are stimulated, preparing the ground for social claims and revolts.

This is reflected in my diaries; they do not represent a personal perspective derived from an inner psychology, but rather illustrate issues concerning the essence of human condition and the interrelation between individual and social structures as well as the reversal of stereotypical approaches. My work could be described by the following leitmotif: the imagery of sharpened objects (razors, hooks, knives, nails) that are converted from menacing tools into symbols of awakening. My work depicts the human figure and different body parts, specifically the hand, and shows the craftsmanship of construction and destruction. I believe that the physical presence of people is the premise behind the making of things and my purpose is to break the “clinical” image that we have for the human body and its functions; that’s why I tend to deconstruct and reformulate the human form through different syntheses. As Thomas de Quincy says: “Essence comes from the senses. Form comes from the mind”. My work reveals the perishable nature of our fragile form and our essence inscribed in practice.

Through a visual vocabulary, I try to reawaken the primordial sense of animality which has been repressed by rationalistic views since the Age of Enlightenment. Combined with classical philosophy and Christianity, rational thought has established the norms that define “objectivity” and legitimacy and which have, ultimately, led the western world to decay. I believe that a turn to subjectivity and personal growth might enable us to break new ground and reconfigure our consciousness.

Pavlos Nikolakopoulos

Photos

Untitled (from the series diary 7), 2000, ink and acrylic on paper, 11,7 x 16,7 cm (each page), Courtesy: Qbox Gallery, Athens and the artist
Untitled (from the series diary 8), 2001, ink, fluorescent spray and acrylic on paper, 11,7 x 16,7 cm (each page), Courtesy: Qbox Gallery, Athens and the artist
Untitled (from the series diary 8), 2001, ink, fluorescent spray and acrylic on paper, 11,7 x 16,7 cm (each page), Courtesy: Qbox Gallery, Athens and the artist

Untitled (12th Istanbul Biennial), 2011 Biennale de Lyon